The rich history of Murchison House has been shaped by the hands of pioneering battlers, wealthy wool merchants and even an Indian Prince!

Today it is a family owned and operated venture endeavouring to continue the pastoral traditions and offer visitors an insight into outback life.


on Bibra Cottage  

on Bibra Cottage

 

Murchison House Station was founded in 1858 by Charles von Bibra to provide meat and wheat to lead miners at Galena, beef to the growing Perth market and remount horses to the British army in India.

The original homestead “von Bibra’s cottage” was built by Charles von Bibra with convict labourers in 1858. Using local materials it was constructed from Tumblagouda sandstone and mud bricks. It now contains memorabilia of times gone by...

Homestead & Garden  

Homestead & Garden

 

Construction of the main house began around 1895. Originally constructed as two separate buildings joined by a breezeway it has been extensively modified over the years according to the needs of the various occupants. (The house is still a private residence and is not open to the public.)       

Shearers Quarters

Shearers Quarters

Wool Press

Wool Press

Old Cars on Demolition Row

Old Cars on Demolition Row

Graves

Graves

The Shearers quarters were built in 1860 also using convict labour. By the 1990's, this building had fallen into disrepair but has now been rendered and refurbished.  It now provides basic but comfortable accommodation for people who enjoy the bush but aren't equipped for camping (or perhaps just prefer a comfy bed!)                          

 

 

 

The original shearing shed also dates back to the 1860’s. In its heyday up to 35000 sheep would be brought to this shed for shearing.

Features include the extensive use of Oregon pine and the 100 year old wool press and wool classing table.

 

 

A surprising collection of military vehicles, earthmoving equipment vintage cars and farm machinery has found a final resting place on Murchison House Station.  

"Depreciation Row" showcases an assortment of machinery worn out by a life on the station.

 

There are several graves at the homestead cemetery, some marked by impressive headstones, others not marked at all. 

The graves pictured are those of R.N. Fawcett and E.W. Broad, the pilot and mechanic aboard one of three aeroplanes participating in Australia first commercial air service in 1921. They were tragically killed  when their plane crashed not far from the homestead.